How to Support Aging Parents Who Resist Assistance

A man tries to reason with his older father as he struggles to know how to support aging parents who need help but refuse to accept it.

These tips will help you know how to support aging parents who need help but refuse to accept it.

It is a challenging predicament many family caregivers encounter: your elderly parents, who once looked after you, now resist the aid they so desperately need to remain safe and comfortable living at home. Family members face a delicate balance between respecting their parents’ freedom and protecting their safety and well-being. When you are in this situation, you’re not alone! We understand the range of emotions associated with accepting the need for help, and have some suggestions that will help you understand how to support aging parents who are resistant to accepting care.

See It From Their Perspective

Understanding the reasons for your parents’ resistance is a good place to start. In many cases, it arises from a wish to retain self-sufficiency and control of their lives. Aging can be a daunting process, marked by physical and cognitive changes that can leave seniors feeling vulnerable. By refusing support, they might be seeking to affirm their autonomy and preserve a feeling of dignity.

However, their refusal can also be fueled by fear or denial. Acknowledging the need for assistance can be intimidating, as it might signify a loss of independence. Additionally, some individuals may simply not understand the extent of their limitations or even the available support options.

Reaching an Agreement About the Need for Care

So, what can be done when faced with this challenging scenario? First, come to the discussion with understanding and empathy. Acknowledge your parents’ feelings and concerns, and assure them that your goal is to support them in maintaining their independence and well being.

Begin by listening actively to their position. Understanding their reasons for resisting care can help you tailor your approach and deal with their specific fears. Reassure them that accepting help does not mean that they are losing control, but rather that they are ensuring they will be able to live at home safely and comfortably.

Compromising is often a great way to reach agreement with your parents. For example, if the idea of having help with baths or showers is off-putting, propose the idea of assistance with housekeeping, meals, and running errands. When they get to know and trust their caregiver with these types of less-intimidating services, it’s easier to work your way up to additional care.

If your parents are still unsure about accepting help, consider enlisting the help of a trusted third party, such as a doctor. In some cases, hearing advice from an objective professional can carry more weight than coming from a member of the family.

Most importantly, keep in mind that change doesn’t happen overnight. It may well require several conversations and gentle persuasion before your parents feel more comfortable about accepting help. Be persistent yet compassionate, and always prioritize their feelings and wishes.

At Responsive Home Care, we have helped many older adults live fuller and more enriching lives at home, and we are here to help your parents whenever they are ready, with tailored in-home care solutions in Fort Lauderdale, Deerfield Beach, Plantation, and the neighboring communities. We offer a complimentary in-home consultation to help you and your parents talk through the services that will best meet their needs. Reach out to us any time at 954-486-6440.

6 Ways to Help a Senior Loved One Sleep Better

A man lies awake in bed. It can be difficult for family members to know how to help a senior loved one sleep better.

Try these tips to help a senior loved one sleep better.

We have all been there: slowing down breathing, counting sheep, listening to white noise, all in an effort to force our brains to shut down to allow us the sleep we desperately need. As we age, it can be even more difficult to get enough sleep. Older adults may experience changes in their sleep architecture, including lighter sleep, more frequent awakenings, and a shift towards earlier bedtimes. Yet maintaining healthy sleep patterns is very important for cognitive function, emotional health, and physical vitality, making it important to know how to help a senior loved one sleep better.

What Affects Sleep Patterns in Older Adults?

There are numerous factors impacting senior sleep, including:

  • Health Conditions: Chronic pain, arthritis, and respiratory issues can contribute to discomfort during the night.
  • Circadian Rhythm Changes: Aging can adjust the body’s internal clock, leading to a preference for earlier bed and wake times.
  • Environmental Factors: Temperature, noise, and light can affect sleep quality.
  • Medications: Certain medications may have side effects that disrupt sleep patterns.

So, How Can You Help a Senior Loved One Sleep Better?

  • Relaxation Techniques: There are a variety of relaxation techniques that older adults can incorporate into their pre-sleep routine, such as mindfulness exercises, deep breathing, and gentle stretching routines. There are both physical and mental benefits of relaxation practices in preparing the mind and body for a restful night of sleep.
  • Limited Naps: Though there are benefits to short naps, longer naps, especially later in the day, makes it harder to fall and stay asleep at night. Emphasize the importance of brief, rejuvenating naps while cautioning against extended daytime sleep, which could disrupt the natural sleep-wake cycle.
  • Regular Exercise: Exercise is important, but just as important is the timing of physical activity. Engaging in exercise early in the day can play a role in better sleep. Encourage activities that the person enjoys, whether it is a morning walk, gardening, or light yoga, fostering a healthy routine that aligns along with their preferences.
  • A Comfortable Sleep Environment: Make sure the mattress and pillows are comfortable and supportive. Consider soft, breathable bedding materials, and if applicable, invest in sleep-inducing scents or a white noise machine to create an optimal atmosphere for relaxation.
  • A Consistent Routine: Encouraging a regular sleep routine is critical for seniors. Beyond sticking with consistent bedtimes and wake-up times, consider incorporating calming pre-sleep rituals. This might include activities like reading a book, listening to soothing music, or practicing gentle meditation to signal to the body that it’s time to wind down.
  • Mindful Eating: Specific foods promote sleep, such as those rich in magnesium or tryptophan. Additionally, herbal teas are known for their calming properties. Offer practical tips on portion control and timing to optimize the positive impact of nutrition on sleep.

Our caregivers are helping older adults in our community stay engaged and active, eat healthier, and enjoy calming routines that foster better sleep habits. Contact us at 954-486-6440 to learn how our home care services can assist someone you love in Fort Lauderdale, Plantation, Lighthouse Point, and the surrounding areas.

Reality Orientation in Dementia: The Pro and the Cons

A caregiver helps guide a senior with dementia through reality orientation.

Reality orientation can help loved ones with dementia through confusion.

Did you ever wake up in the middle of a dream and wonder, just for a moment, if what you were dreaming about was real? It can feel very disorienting until you open your eyes and take in your familiar surroundings. An experience like this can give you just a brief glimpse into the ongoing disorientation for a person with dementia. When confusion about time, place, and even identity settle in for a person you love, you’re faced with two options for responding: either stepping into their reality with them, or practicing reality orientation for someone with dementia.

Which Reality Is Best?

In a nutshell, each approach has its place in dementia care. However, there are specific cautions to understand when using reality orientation for someone with dementia. It is important to first understand what is involved with both options and when they could be most appropriate.

Accepting Their Reality

Living in an alternate reality is quite typical for a person in the mid to later stages of dementia. The individual may believe they are a young adult engaged in their previous career (or a different one altogether), with a spouse and young children to look after. Going along with their perception of reality helps them maintain a feeling of self-worth and purpose. It instills comfort and peace, and it is often the recommended approach.

Orienting Them to Your Reality

On the other hand, reality orientation involves providing cues and prompts about the current time, date, and place. Studies have shown that it can improve cognitive functioning, especially when combined with donepezil, and help with some of the more difficult aspects of dementia.

However, reality orientation should be handled gently with compassion, skill, and awareness of the person’s emotional state. For example, if the person asks where their mother is, it could be extremely harmful to respond, “Why, she died 40 years ago! You are 95 years old, so there is no way your mother could still be alive.” In contrast, reality orientation may be effective in ordinary conversations. For instance, if the individual wakes up and asks what day it is, you might respond, “Today is Friday, the day you have your exercise class and then dinner with Steve.”

If the person seems to become agitated or anxious with reality, it’s always best to join them in the perceived reality that feels comfortable to them.

Our specially trained caregivers are pros at knowing how to effectively engage someone with dementia and make each day the best it can be. We utilize imaginative, customized approaches that help with memory, communication, safety, and comfort, while encouraging independence and a sense of purpose and self-worth.

Reach out to us at (954) 486-6440 for more information on our dementia care in Fort Lauderdale, Deerfield Beach, Plantation, and the surrounding areas.

 

Are You Prepared for the Responsibilities of Hospital Care at Home?

A woman in a wheelchair receiving hospital care at home is assisted by her adult daughter.

It’s important to understand and prepare for your role before agreeing to hospital care at home for a loved one.

No one wants to spend any more time than needed in the hospital. The aim is to get the necessary treatment or procedure over with as quickly as possible and move on to recovering. Unsurprisingly, the growing trend in hospital care at home is one being met with open arms. Imagine being able to avoid:

  • Isolation and loneliness from short visiting hour periods
  • The risk of infection inherent in a hospitalization
  • The need to share a room with somebody else who is ill
  • Institutional food
  • The bright lights, alarms, and bells that make sleeping difficult

Hospital level care in the home allows someone whose condition is serious yet stable to receive visits from clinicians and any necessary medical equipment—so treatment is provided in the most comfortable and least restrictive environment.

There is nothing not to love about such a program, right?

The Downside to Receiving Hospital Care at Home

While the benefits of in-home hospital care are incredible, there’s one main factor to take into consideration: are you ready and equipped to serve as the caregiver for a family member who is critically ill? While physicians and nurses visit the home and are available by telehealth sessions for questions, the majority of care falls on the family.

“In the hospital, if something happens, they know how to take care of it,” explains Clare Semling, whose husband participated in a hospital-at-home program. “Now it’s on you.”

It’s important for family members to participate in the decision-making process about a loved one receiving hospital care in the home, and also to be made aware of the implications it will mean in their own lives. For instance, you’ll need to think through:

  • What will you do in the event of an emergency?
  • Can you handle getting up as required during the night to check on the person, help them to the bathroom, etc.?
  • Are you ok with having clinical staff coming in and out of the home at regular intervals?
  • Will you be able to manage medications and ensure they’re taken as directed?

Also, think about your current commitments and responsibilities: caring for children, taking care of household chores and errands, working outside of the home, and other important activities such as spending time with your spouse, nurturing relationships with friends and other friends, participating in hobbies and pastimes you enjoy, engaging in healthy lifestyle choices, etc.

It can be helpful to create a quick estimate of how much time you currently have available to care for a family member at home, considering all of the factors above. If it feels unmanageable or overwhelming, seek out help.

Responsive Home Care is here to help if a loved one chooses to receive hospital-at-home care. We can provide medication reminders, run errands, prepare meals, and take the night shift if you would like, enabling you to maintain the healthy life balance you need. Contact us at 954-486-6440 for more information on how we can help with personalized in-home care services in Fort Lauderdale, Lighthouse Point, Hollywood, and the surrounding communities.

Can You Handle Embarrassing Dementia Behaviors in Public?

An older woman stands in the grocery store, leaning on her cart with a calm expression on her face.

If you’re not sure how to handle embarrassing dementia behaviors in public, these tips can help.

Dementia is unpredictable, to say the least. It can transform a person’s mood, personality, and behaviors in the blink of an eye. When you’re at home caring for a person with dementia, these changes can be hard enough to manage. But what happens when embarrassing dementia behaviors arise when you are at a grocery store, restaurant, or hair salon?

Simple Tips to Change Cringeworthy to Calm

Fear of a public outburst can make you want to eliminate venturing out at all with someone with Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia. However, being out in the community is very important. It gives someone with dementia a feeling of purpose, eases loneliness and isolation, offers opportunities to socialize, and much more.

Understanding how to cope with an uncomfortable situation before going out is key. These recommendations can help.

  • Keep calm. Your demeanor and attitude are highly contagious to a loved one with dementia. Take a deep breath and give yourself a pep talk before stepping out the door. Remind yourself to remain calm and patient, regardless of what happens.
  • Carry cards. If you are worried about how embarrassing dementia behaviors may impact others around you, create some small business-sized cards that you can discreetly hand out. They can simply state, “Please forgive any impolite actions or outbursts. These are the result of dementia.”
  • Track triggers. Keep a journal to make note of details on difficult behaviors in public and then look for commonalities. You might find, for example, that the individual does well in a small store or restaurant, but becomes distraught when there are large crowds, too much noise, or bright lights. There might be a specific time of day that is more distressing to be out, or physical needs could be an issue, such as hunger, thirst, pain, fatigue, or the need to use the restroom.

How In-Home Care Can Help

Our dementia care experts are available to help manage the effects of the disease, with patience, skill, and creativity. As seasoned experts who are fully trained in a wide range of dementia care needs, we have seen it all! We understand just how to restore calm to somebody who is distressed or agitated, ensuring respect and dignity throughout an outburst.

A few of the many challenging symptoms of dementia we are able to help manage include:

  • Aggression
  • Sundowning
  • Hallucinations and delusions
  • Wandering
  • Anxiety
  • Confusion and disorientation
  • And more

Whether you are looking for just a couple hours of respite care to allow time for you to take a break, overnight support or live-in care to ensure safety and wellbeing while you get much-needed rest, or anything in between, we’re here for you.

Give us a call at 954-486-6440 for more tips and resources, and to learn more about our specialized in-home dementia care in Tamarac, Parkland, Fort Lauderdale, and the surrounding areas.

New Caregiver Nervousness? Relax…These Tips Will Ensure a Smooth Transition to Care!

An older man is standing by the front door, shaking hands with a new caregiver as he welcomes her into his home.

Try these tips when inviting a new caregiver into the home to ease the transition to care.

The big day has arrived: Dad’s first day with his new caregiver! If your family is similar to many, you might be feeling a variety of emotions: relief, uncertainty, and anxiety, to name a few. These emotions are typical and perfectly normal. A little advance preparation and planning for this important milestone can help ensure a comfortable and smooth transition for everyone.

It’s important to bear in mind that your Responsive Home Care caregiver is fully trained and experienced in senior care in the home. Their one and only goal is to make life better for the individuals they serve. They do not need or expect to be entertained, something that is surprisingly often a concern for care recipients.

What Can You Do to Encourage a Rewarding Caregiving Bond?

There are steps you can take to help a new caregiver feel welcomed in a senior loved one’s home and start the relationship off on the right foot. For instance:

Give the caregiver a tour of the home, pointing out any noteworthy items such as the closet with cleaning supplies, emergency contact information, medicine cabinet, etc. Do not be concerned about over-explaining details that are important to your parent. If they like their sandwiches lightly toasted, always watch a specific game show at 11 am, and enjoy a walk to visit with neighbors after breakfast, let the caregiver know. Remember that your feedback is very important – both positive and negative. Reach out to our office and let us know about anything the caregiver is doing especially well, or anything you would like to see done in another way. We’re happy when you’re happy! We work hard to make sure each person’s needs are fully met, and that includes incorporating changes when necessary.

About Our Caregivers

We want you to be able to relax and have the confidence in knowing a family member is in the absolute best hands with our caregiving services. Each of our caregivers has been extensively interviewed, background checked, and trained. They are also carefully matched to each individual in their care based on likes, dislikes, personality type, and more. Each member of our team is someone we would thoroughly trust caring for our own loved ones. And if at any time, for any reason, you’d like to request a different caregiver, we will honor that request; no questions asked.

Contact Us to Learn More

Although the transition can be tough, know that your loved one’s caregiver will be providing enhanced opportunities for socialization, safety, and enjoyment in life, offering you much-needed peace of mind. For more information about our in-home care services in Davie, Coconut Creek, Fort Lauderdale, and the surrounding areas, contact us any time at 954-486-6440.

How to Talk to Older Loved Ones About Aging Care

Adult son and elderly father sit on a couch having a conversation.

These tips can help you talk to older loved ones about aging care in a calm and respectful way.

Maybe you remember having “the talk” with your parents about those cringeworthy pre-teen topics. If you thought that was uncomfortable, brace yourself for having to talk to older loved ones about aging care issues and concerns you are noticing at home! This is often very difficult, for several reasons:

  • Your parents may resent what appears to be a reversal of roles or being told what to do
  • They could be in denial that there’s a problem at all
  • They could feel threatened and fearful of losing independence and the freedom to make their own choices

How can you overcome these very valid feelings to come to a place of acceptance about home care services? Try these tips as a starting point to talk to older loved ones about aging care:

  • Plan the conversation: what you will discuss, who will attend, where you can best talk without distractions.
  • Think through what it would be like to be in your parents’ shoes and exactly how you would want the conversation to go.
  • Resolve to remain calm and respectful through the entire discussion, never attempting to parent your parents.
  • Listen to your parents’ worries with an open mind and without preplanned responses.
  • Realize there may be more than one solution – and, that it often takes more than one conversation to achieve agreement.

Before approaching your parents, practice what you want to say with someone you trust to give you straightforward feedback. Role-playing is a good strategy to refine your presentation and words and to help you gain confidence.

When you are ready to talk with your parents, be prepared for any outcome. In a perfect world, they will agree with your concerns and be open to having the support of a home care professional. It’s certainly possible that they share your concerns, but were unsure how to broach the subject with you. But likewise, be prepared for resistance, defensiveness, and possibly even anger.

In the event that the discussion is producing heightened emotions and you are reaching an impasse, shelve the conversation and try again later. It may be beneficial to include someone your parents trust and respect in a subsequent conversation, such as a close friend or medical professional.

When you are ready to explore home care options for your parents, contact Responsive Home Care. We can start out with minimal support, such as meals, transportation accompaniment, or light housekeeping, and slowly work up to more care once your parents feel comfortable with their caregiver.

We understand how difficult it can be for someone to acknowledge the need for assistance at home. Our goal is always to cultivate an environment of independence in which each individual in our care remains as much in control of all of life’s decisions as possible. You can connect with us 24/7 at (954) 486-6440 for more information about our highly personalized home care services in Hollywood, Plantation, Lighthouse Point, and the surrounding areas.

Keeping a Sense of Purpose for Seniors Leads to a More Fulfilling Life

Learn the importance of maintaining a sense of purpose for seniors.

What motivates you to push forward every day? If you are part of the sandwich generation, taking care of both older and younger loved ones, your list is probably quite long! However, for aging adults, as the nest empties, it becomes important to redefine their identity and learn new ways to bring meaning to each day. Read more

Starting Home Care: What to do When Family Is in Denial

When a family member refuses the need for parents starting home care, we have tips to help.

Once you realize that an aging loved one could benefit from starting home care services, it’s not uncommon for the aging loved one to be resistant to the idea. After all, acknowledging the need for assistance is not easy, especially for an individual who values their privacy and independence. However, it gets more challenging when another family member is the one in denial about starting home care. When you’ve reached an impasse within your family in regards to the need for senior care, there’s one very likely culprit to consider: denial. Read more

Make Life Easier With a Daily Routine for Seniors With Dementia

senior-lady-dementia-eating

A daily routine for seniors with dementia can make life easier!

Do you ever feel lost or disoriented after waking up from a dream? The dream seemed so real, and it takes a few minutes to regain your bearings. For someone with dementia, this confusion is part of everyday life. Our goal in providing care for someone with Alzheimer’s is to help provide as much stability as possible, and one of the simplest ways to achieve this is by building a daily routine for seniors with dementia.

How Can a Daily Routine for Seniors With Dementia or Alzheimer’s Help?

Short-term memory loss makes it challenging for someone with dementia to learn and remember new things. A familiar routine helps build self-confidence, reinforce a sense of independence, and minimize anxiety.

To establish the most comfortable routine for a senior loved one with dementia, try the following:

  • Make it meaningful. Include time every day for responsibilities that increase the person’s self-worth and sense of purpose, according to their abilities: folding laundry, sorting papers, mixing a salad, etc.
  • Choose activities that relate to lifelong interests. Consider the person’s particular interests and incorporate those in some manner into their routine: music, gardening, fishing, knitting, etc.
  • Follow their lead. Retain any routines the older adult already has established: a morning shower before breakfast, meals at the same seat at the table as always, an afternoon television program, a walk after dinner, etc.
  • Adjust as needed. Over time, as the disease progresses, the person’s ability level will change, making it harder to accomplish parts of their routine. The goal should be to always make an effort to provide as many opportunities for independence as possible, even if modifications are needed.

Obviously, life doesn’t always make it easy to follow a daily routine. Even family caregivers require time away for at least a few hours a week. It can be helpful for the person in your care to have a respite caregiver step in before you take time away, incorporating them into their regular routine . That will likely make it easier for you to step away, knowing the senior is already familiar and comfortable with their professional caregiver.

The best care experience for seniors with dementia requires specialized training and expertise. Our dementia caregivers are experts in providing creative, patient care and easing the difficult symptoms of the disease, and we are here with just as much or little assistance as you need. Contact us any time online or at (954) 486-6440 for a complimentary in-home consultation for additional information about our Alzheimer’s care in Fort Lauderdale and the nearby areas.

How to Help Manage the Challenges of Medical Tests for Aging Adults

senior-man-getting-ct-scan-with-technician

If you need to help an aging loved one manage the challenges of medical tests, Responsive Home Care can assist!

There is almost always nothing “routine” about routine checkups at the doctor. You may arrive to your appointment perfectly fine, but leave with orders for blood work along with other medical tests a doctor recommends to help keep you as healthy as possible. These tests might be nothing more than a minor inconvenience for you, however trying to manage the challenges of medical tests for older adults can be overwhelming for many reasons: transportation problems, thinner skin, mobility issues, cognitive difficulties, fragile veins, and so much more.

There are steps you can take to advocate for and help an older loved one manage the challenges of medical tests more easily. For example:

  • Find out if tests can be carried out in the individual’s home. Home health care is becoming an increasingly viable option for blood work along with other tests.
  • If the aging adult has to leave home for the test, call the facility where the test will be conducted ahead of time. Find answers to any specific questions you may have about parking, drop-off location, the best time of day to schedule for the test, etc.
  • Providing a urine or stool sample can be challenging. Ask the doctor for any recommendations to help make the process easier, for example, a receptacle to position over the toilet as opposed to using a cup. Make sure the bathroom floor is clean and dry and that any bathmats or throw rugs are removed, and encourage the person to hold onto a grab bar during the collection process to prevent a fall.

Can Home Care Services Help Manage the Challenges of Medical Tests for Aging Adults?

An in-home caregiver from Responsive Home Care can:

  • Pick up prescriptions and provide medication reminders to make certain that meds are taken exactly as prescribed
  • Provide accompaniment to medical appointments, tests, and procedures, while assisting with mobility support as needed
  • Take notes to make sure doctors’ orders are understood and followed
  • Help the person to get settled safely back at home afterwards, and provide companionship and oversight to watch for any changes in condition that should be reported
  • And so much more

Also, many individuals feel much more comfortable receiving assistance for sensitive medical matters from a trained professional. Our caregivers are skilled in discreet and respectful support with personal care needs, allowing family relations to step back and offer the older adult with privacy.

Contact us online or at (954) 486-6440 to arrange for the support necessary for someone you love. We offer a free of charge in-home consultation that will help you understand your options, so contact us today to learn more about our senior care in Hollywood, FL and the nearby areas!

Important Questions When Visiting Parents Over The Holidays

Happy senior woman drinking coffee

Keep these questions in mind when visiting parents over the holiday season.

It’s been a while since you’ve been able to spend time with Mom. Now that the holiday season is here, you will have some quality time to catch up. Of course, you’ll want to make the most of this time with each other, but it’s also the perfect time to assess how she is really doing, and if there are any changes in her health that may have gone unnoticed through phone conversations and FaceTime.

To help you determine areas of possible concern to assess while visiting seniors in your family this year, we’ve put together a list of questions to answer when visiting seniors in your family this holiday season. Some of these questions you may wish to ask the senior outright, while others can be answered by evaluating the home environment and the person himself.

Financial/Elder Abuse

  • Has she provided anyone with personal information over the phone or internet?
  • Does the senior seem more timid or anxious than usual?
  • Has she cosigned for a loan for anyone?
  • Does she suddenly have a new “friendship” with someone whose motives may be questionable?
  • Is she communicating with strangers online?
  • Are there any changes in her banking activity?

Physical/Mental Health

  • Is she eating more or less than usual?
  • Is she actively engaged in enjoyable activities?
  • Do you notice any bruises or other injuries that could indicate a fall?
  • Is she having trouble falling or staying asleep?
  • Is she spending time with friends?
  • Has she gained or lost weight?
  • Does she seem happy and content?
  • Does she seem short of breath?
  • Does the senior seem to be moving more slowly and cautiously?
  • Is she stumbling or holding onto furniture or the wall to get around?

Home Maintenance

  • Is there clutter in the home that could pose a fall risk?
  • Are the bed linens being changed regularly?
  • Is the laundry clean and put away?
  • Are there any hazards you’re noticing, such as scorch marks on pans or the countertop that could indicate inattention to cooking?
  • Is the home cleaned to the senior’s typical standards?
  • Is the yard maintained?

Cognitive Functioning

  • Is she struggling to remember the names of familiar people or objects?
  • Is she misplacing items, only to find them in unexpected places, such as the car keys in the refrigerator?
  • Does the senior seem more forgetful or confused than usual?
  • Is she repeating questions or statements in conversations?
  • Are there pieces of mail and bills that have not been opened?
  • Are you noticing any unusual behaviors?

If you are in any way concerned about the safety or wellbeing of any loved ones while you’re visiting seniors in your family this year, professional home care services can help. Reach out to Responsive Home Care, the top home health agency in Hollywood, FL and the nearby areas, for more information.