Fall Safety Tips for Seniors to Regain Confidence And Strength After a Fall

senior woman receiving assistance from caregiverWhile circus clowns and comedians may stir audiences to laughter over such stunts as slipping on a banana peel, there is nothing funny about falling when it comes to aging parents, who are at an elevated risk for serious injuries, which could lead to an extended rehabilitation process. Not only that, but there’s a lesser known complication that typically arises from an older adult’s fall: a fear of falling again which can be significant enough to impact quality of life and health.

As the saying goes, “Once bitten, twice shy.” It’s natural – and sensible – for an older adult who has fallen to want to take precautions to prevent a subsequent fall. Yet for most, the fear of falling prevents essential physical exercise, bringing about weakness and reduced balance confidence, each of which can actually boost the likelihood of falling again.

Instead, it’s essential for senior loved ones to:

  • Strengthen muscles. Ask the doctor and/or physical therapist for appropriate exercises to engage in after a fall. Building strength is an essential component to preventing future falls.
  • Assess the home. Walk through the older adult’s home to check for any cords, clutter, throw rugs, etc. which can cause a tripping hazard. Make sure there is sufficient lighting and install grab bars in the bathroom and anywhere else supplementary support might be helpful.
  • Discuss it. Seniors may feel embarrassed for having fallen; however, it’s important to talk about what happened in order to decide what precautionary measures can be taken to make sure that it doesn’t occur again.

It’s also helpful for older adults to create goals, with the aid of a medical professional, and to start to work towards attaining them. The goals must be reasonable and fairly easily attainable in order to instill confidence, for example being able to walk up and down the stairs independently while holding the handrail over the next two weeks, or walking the total length of the backyard within 4 weeks.

Once an objective has been set, define the steps necessary to attain that goal. What types of training can help strengthen the muscles essential to go up and down the stairs, or to take an extended walk? And if the goal is not achieved, consider what prevented the accomplishment, and what additional steps could be taken to set and reach a brand new goal.

Most importantly, be sure to provide reassurance and support to cheer a senior on towards regaining his or her self-assurance and confidence and to lessen any fear.

For more tips on preventing falls, or to arrange for a no cost in-home safety assessment, call the aging care experts at Responsive Home Care any time at 954-486-6440.

Secrets to Happiness Despite Pain or Chronic Illness

Seniors experiencing pain or chronic illness can still experience joy. Learn how to help here.

Have you ever gotten out of bed and said, “It’s likely to be one of those days!” Maybe your alarm didn’t go off, the hot water heater decided to stop working, and the dog chewed up one of your most loved shoes overnight. Then consider if every day were “one of those days!” For someone coping with a chronic disease (and that’s the majority of the older adult population), day-to-day struggles and challenges can be a given.

Responsive Home Care presents a few steps that seniors can take to discover and maintain a life of joy, even throughout the face of chronic illness. For example:

  • Follow passions. Seeking purpose and meaning in each day is vital – and attainable. Many seniors find gratification in aiding and supporting other people. Others thrive on being lifelong learners. For some it can mean documenting earlier times for the next generation. Brainstorm ideas until you arrive at one that sparks passion, and then make it a real possibility.
  • Practice positivity. One smart way to accomplish an even more positive take on life is by journaling. Encourage your elder loved ones to start every day by developing a summary of everything they’re thankful for that morning, including the relatively ordinary: the smell of fresh coffee brewing, a cat curled up in a sunbeam, an upcoming lunch date with a relative. At the conclusion of every week, sit together and read back through the prior entries for a quick and effective pick-me-up.
  • Try to avoid negativity. Including a measure of positivity as mentioned above can naturally result in minimized negativity, but there are additional steps which can be followed as well. For instance, provide for breaks from activities that induce frustration, allowing for needed time to de-stress. Place the emphasis on undertaking tasks which can be executed successfully, and find an alternate solution for those that are much too challenging, such as assigning those tasks to another relative or friend, or employing the services of a specialist.
  • Get out of the house. Preserving as active a lifestyle as possible outside the home is usually so energizing for older adults. Help your elder loved ones go out for hair appointments, shopping adventures, visits with relatives, along with other fun outings, as much as they are able. Even simply stepping outdoors and relaxing on the front porch when weather allows can substantially enhance someone’s spirits and outlook.

At Responsive Home Care, it is our aim to help older adults attain the highest possible quality of life without exception. Our professionally trained and experienced caregivers provide pleasant companionship, interesting activities, transportation, and more. Contact us at 954-486-6440 and discover how we can make a difference by providing a home health aide in Fort Lauderdale, FL or the surrounding areas! See our full service area here.

Senior Care Strategy: Incorporate “Play” to Strengthen Both Mind and Body

Happy funny senior couple playing hulahoop in park

Learn about the senior health benefits of “play” and how home care in Coral Springs, FL can help.

Do you remember that feeling as a child when the school bell rang, indicating the end of arithmetic and the start of the best part of the day: recess? There was a tremendous sensation of freedom dashing out onto the playground, leaving behind the pressure of school work for a quick period of unstructured play. Read more